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Home Search Results India Ley  Manali Cycling Tour. Itineray
Country: India
Duration: 21 days
Area: Ley
Activities: Biking
Max. Group Size: 17  Person
Min. Group Size: 4 Person
Difficulty: 4
Max. Altitude: 5,350  M.
Seasons: Sept-Nov, March-June

Dates will be available soon.

Price List will be available soon.

Map will be available soon.

Optional program 1>Mountain flight. 2>One night two days White water rafting on Bhote Kasi River. 3>Two night tree days Jungle safari at Chitwan national Park or at Bardia National Park. 4> Two night three days Yoga Meditions

Manali Cycling Tour.

Trip DetailDetail ItineraryPrice List


Day by Day Itinerary
Day 01 - Arrive in Kathmandu O/N Hotel

Arrive in Kathmandu O/N Hotel

Day 02 - Sightseeing around Kathmandu O/N Hotel

Sightseeing around Kathmandu Bhaktapur, Shyambhu Pashupati And Boudha Nath O/N Hotel.

Day 03 - Fly to Delhi and Ley O/N Hotel

Fly from Kathmandu to Delhi then on to Leh, where we transfer to hotel. We take rest to acclimatise, unpack our bikes, turn a few nuts and enjoy the panoramic view of the Indus Valley.

Day 04 - Sightseeing around Ley O/N Hotel

We can cycle or drive to Leh to see the sights and shop. We have the option of returning to our hotel by bike or bus.

Day 05 -

Shey and Thiksey Monasteries (26km) We leave our hotel on a screamer of a downhill and panoramic views of the Indus Valley, crossing over the Indus River and then following the river along the fertile riverbanks. This is our first official day of biking! We test our abilities of cycling in this rarefied altitude with a short ride to Shey and Thiksey Monasteries. We pass through desert like terrain strewn with remnants of giant stupas along level tarmac roads to Shey Gompa and onto Thiksey monastery, a small replica of the Tibetan Potala Palace in Lhasa. It is commonly called the 'little Potala' and houses the 40' tall Buddha Maitreya (the coming Buddha), which realises the massive dimensions of the surrounding landscape and architecture that dominates the Ladakh culture. We ride or bus back to Hotel.

Day 06 -

Ride to Alchi monastery and return by bus to Stok or Leh.

Day 07 -

We leave the luxury of the Hotel and begin our journey heading for Hemis Gompa, the most famous Gompa in Leh. We climb up to Hemis monastery and spend some time exploring its hidden treasures. We take lunch at the foot of the Gompa and then continue on a screamer of a downhill back to the base of climb and leave the Indus Valley. At Upshi we start a gradual climb Taglang. From here we follow a meandering stream that passes through a steep narrow gorge surrounded by jagged teeth-like mountains that soar into the sky. The mountainsides change from gray, brown, dull-red, purple, pink and russet green. We camp at willow camp a small planted grove of trees owned by Hemis Gompa.

Day 08 -

Today's short ride slowly ascends towards our base camp below Taglang La. We continue through the gorge and surrounding landscape of sedimentary rocks tilted at all angles by the strains and pressures of unimaginable movement of the earth's crust, slowly gaining altitude. At the picturesque village of Meru the desert-like terrain starts to open-up allowing crops to grow in the fertile land by the river. We continue below Meru through fields of millet following the river leading us to Rumste, a high-altitude Buddhist village. Here we take rest and snacks at Hotel Nepal a local tented camp set-up by nomadic Nepalese from Helambu. From here we can enjoy the spectacular views of snow peaks, high altitude valley, and prayer flag draped homes and ponder our next days climb. We then continue our gentle climb passing through Rumste, a military camp and on to our camp two kilometres on.

Day 09 -

Today we challenge the second highest motorable road in the world! The Taglang La at 5,300m is the most difficult part of the climb. The road slowly switchbacks up through the rugged mountain range that surround the pass. As you crawl in granny-gear to the approach of the pass from the northern side you pass huge slabs of ice-hoping that it won't heat up by one degree and avalanche you over the edge! At the pass we will find wind-blown prayer flags from the many pilgrims who have made the ascent. With some luck we will see great views of the surrounding snow peaks. After cheers of congratulation for completing the ascent we can see our route downhill to Skayang Chu Thang or the More Plains. We camp with the nomads on the More Plains and wild-asses.

Day 10 -

We awake to curious children peeping into the tents. After breakfast and sometime spent wandering around the camp we head out off-road through the More Plains, riding through the widest part of the valley. At the end of the plains, just before Pang, the road drops into a deep gorge. We take in the sunset from above and ride down at dusk to our readymade riverside camp.

Day 11 -

Climbing out of our riverside camp, the road contours the base of the gorge under wind-worn turrets so majestically perched on the shiftless landscape. The road is broken-up from spring thaws and is strewn with rocks and broken tarmac. As we gain altitude snaking along this sometimes precariously perched road heading for the double pass of the Lachung La (5065m) the road surface improves making it easier. We reach the first summit marked with cairns and prayer flags and drop over the screaming descent to Whisky Nala. We head back up the pass contouring the roller coaster road gradually gaining altitude to another summit followed by 21 switchbacks! The descent is through a small canyon, which at the bottom without road rash is the answer to this white 50mph, without much effort. Taking lunch at Brandy Nala we push on another 25km to our camp at Sharchu.

Day 12 -

After a leisurely morning in camp we ride the gentle ascent of 27km to our high camp of 15,826ft. For the first 12 km the road varies from flat to hilly in a wide wind-swept valley. Then the road starts to climb more steadily for the heavens as we start approaching the southern slopes of the Himalayas. The surrounding mountains are more dramatic as they start getting closer to the road. The road narrows causing us to snake through these giant rock formations screeching for the sky. Snow peaks are visible all around you and the scenery passing through this area is spectacular. Reaching what seems like the top of a pass we ascend onto broad marshland with a few abandoned huts. The road gently roller coasters through this terrain and we reach our tented camp at Bharapur.

Day 13 -

Today is a welcomed rest day with an option to hike up to the higher altitude surrounding our camp. From the summit of the surrounding campsite the views are spectacular. It's a photo opportunity not to be missed, best at sunrise or sunset. At such altitudes, the weather can change at any moment so hikers must carry warm and waterproof gear with them. Light hiking shoes are best and should be part of your gear if you plan to walk for the day.

Day 14 -

Breaking camp in the early morning chill we climb the remaining 8 km to the top of Baralacha pass (4924m/16150ft) decorated with Chorten and windswept prayer flags. The pass locally known as 'Pass with crossroads on summit, where trails from Zanskar, Ladakh, Spiti and Lahaul meet. It also gives rise to the three important rivers of the region - Chandra, Bhaga and Unan - in the southeast, northwest and north respectively. The pass in festooned with the traditional Buddhist prayer flags. Chorten, Mani walls and the Mountain View is spectacular. It is time to check breaks, tighten down your helmet and get ready for another white knuckle ride down one of the worlds longest continual road descents. From the summit we descent 1524m/5000ft through the clouds on good tarmac road flying past some spectacular scenery while trying instead of riding. It's ear smiles as coast down hill and care must be taken here because getting out of control and careening over the edge will certainly put a dent in your head. We leave the barrenness of the pass following the Bhaga, River which flows into the Suraj Tal or lake of the Sun, as we descend into the lush slopes of Lahaul the slopes turn green with vegetation and pass groves of trees, so shocking after days of treeless terrain. We reach the police check post of Darcha (3400m/11150ft) going through formalities, take lunch and continue on to Jispa where we make our nights camp.

Day 15 -

Leaving the village of Jispa where the Dalai Lama held the Kalachakra initiation in 1994, we climb gradually to the district headquarters of Keylong (10500ft/3201m) and the largest village on our route. With good weather you can see the 'Lady of Keylong' Silk-routed against the snow capped mountains surrounding Keylong. Looking across the Bhaga River, one sees the picturesque Kibber monastery perched on the hillside. This area we are now passing through has a history dating back to the Rigveda about 1500 BC and is steeped in legends, myths and superstitions both to the Buddhist and Hindus. Departing Keylong and our last stronghold of Buddhist culture we descent down to the confluence of the Chandra-Bhaga Rivers. The road passes through lush hillside with daily light rainfalls and richly cultivated valleys. Apples and apricots grow abundantly here and are a nice change in snacks. We traverse up and down the valley contouring through richly cultivated fields with no major climbs. The road descends back to the river Chandra where we cross over to the southern side of the valley arriving at our lunch spot at Khoksar (10500ft/3201m). After lunch we start climbing up to the Rothang La, where we make our camp 2km outside of Gramphoo i.e. perched on the side of the hillside with great views north across the valley where we just descend.

Day 16 -

Leaving the village of Jispa where the Dalai Lama held the Kalachakra initiation in 1994, we climb gradually to the district headquarters of Keylong (10500ft/3201m) and the largest village on our route. With good weather you can see the 'Lady of Keylong' Silk-routed against the snow capped mountains surrounding Keylong. Looking across the Bhaga River, one sees the picturesque Kibber monastery perched on the hillside. This area we are now passing through has a history dating back to the Rigveda about 1500 BC and is steeped in legends, myths and superstitions both to the Buddhist and Hindus. Departing Keylong and our last stronghold of Buddhist culture we descent down to the confluence of the Chandra-Bhaga Rivers. The road passes through lush hillside with daily light rainfalls and richly cultivated valleys. Apples and apricots grow abundantly here and are a nice change in snacks. We traverse up and down the valley contouring through richly cultivated fields with no major climbs. The road descends back to the river Chandra where we cross over to the southern side of the valley arriving at our lunch spot at Khoksar (10500ft/3201m). After lunch we start climbing up to the Rothang La, where we make our camp 2km outside of Gramphoo i.e. perched on the side of the hillside with great views north across the valley where we just descend.

Day 17 -

Getting out for an early start to climb our lowest pass the Rothang La, at a mere 3980m/12800ft completes our trans-Himalayan passing, but it's not over yet. From our campsite it's approx 1.5hrs to the summit and only 1147m/3764ft. Climbing into the clouds, the Rothang is famous for always being in clouds, accept for the pious pilgrims thus our prayer flag offerings at the top of every pass. We offer our last prayer flag upon the careen and head down into good tarmac road. Watch out for the tired bikers! The descent through the starkness of the pass and into the lush tropical forested slopes of the Kullu Valley is magical. Flowers are blossoming scenting the air, cascading water falls abound as we traverse down through heavy forested pine tree slopes being greeted by applauding Indian tourist who's admiration is clearly in their faxes is a fitting way to end this classic ride. As we get closer to Manali, civilization we start having to adjust to the colour, activity, cars houses and amazement that the ride of a lifetime is almost successfully completed. Arriving at the alpine setting of the British hill station of Manali is wonderful. Hot tubs, great Indian food and colourful people of Manali await our exploring.

Day 18 -

Manali is known for its fine woven shawls and hats. Shopping is a bargain here and all shops are conveniently located in one place. A short walk up to the main temple of Manali is worthwhile and from here you can take in a bird's eye view of Manali and its surrounding area. After an early dinner on your own we board the bus (5pm) for Delhi. As we travel down to Kullu we make the most of our last views of the Kullu Valley as sunset draws in.

Day 19 -

Fly from Delhi to Kathmandu O/N Hotel

Day 20 -

Free day in Kathmandu O/N Hotel

Day 21 -

Departure.